Not quite a treatment- but we can now tell IF Alzheimer’s will develop

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John Trojanowski, of the University of Pennsylvania lead a research study  that has isolated attest that seems to be 100% accurate in predicting who will develop Alzheimer’s.  The results will be presented in Archives of Neurology.

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Our Personalities Reflect Different Sizes of Brain Regions- Or Vice-Versa

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We now see that our personalities become fixed at a rather early age; some of us can, indeed, change our types (previous post), but it’s somewhat hard.  …  Most of us attributed these things to how  neurotransmitters and hormones affect our brain centers.  Yet, we also know that certain parts of the brain are associated with different behaviors.  The medial orbitofrontal cortex is involved with rewards (as is the neurotransmitter dopamine); other regions are associated with threat response; still others with negative effects and punishment; lateral prefrontal cortex deals with planning and voluntary behavior; and, there’s a region associated with  examining the mental states of others.

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Our Personalities Gel By The Time We Are In First Grade

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An upcoming publication in the Journal of Social, Psychological, and Personality Science (lead author Christopher Nave)  indicates that our personality traits seem to be set at very early ages.  This does not mean that people can’t change; it’s a more difficult process, but it can occur.Personality and Major

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Roy A. Ackerman, PhD, EA, is a polymath whose interests span chemical engineering, medicine, biotechnology, business, management, among other areas. Among his inventions/developments: hemodialyzer, dialysate, neurosurgical drill, respiratory inspirometer, colon electrolyte lavage, urinary catheters, cardiac catheters, water reuse systems, drinking water systems, ammonia degrading microbes, toxic chemical reduction via microbes, on-site waste water treatment systems, electronic health care information systems, bookkeeping and accounting programs, among many others.
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Spinal Cord Regrowth May Be Possible- but not tomorrow.

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The ability to grow brain and spinal cord nerve cells is present at birth- and starts to disappear just like that as we age.  So, when we incur an injury to the spine or the brain- the axons (as discussed earlier) can’t regenerate.  It is thought that since these areas are replete with nerves and nerve fibers, they send signals to stop new connections from forming. By stopping new pathways from forming, our brain can’t be confused with by incorrect signals that could result from the new pathways.

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Can your read my mind? Can you see my dreams?

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Can we really read people’s dreams?  Sorry, in spite of what Cobb says, we can’t do it- yet.  (I am not telling you not to see Inception; I think the movie is among the most intelligent I have seen.) But, scientists are working on it.  Here are some of the approaches being taken.

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